The Diabetes Lesson

I have been living with type 1 diabetes for over 35 years now.  I was diagnosed at age 14 in November of 1976.  Next week I will be “having” my 50th birthday.  I am physically more in tune with my body now than I have ever been.  I discovered a path of healing that has, progressively, provided me with more health and balance.  I am committed to staying on this path until I realize a complete cure of the physical manifestation called type 1 diabetes.

I want to share with you a perspective that I have discovered.  I ask you to contemplate what I have to show you and test it out.  I further ask that you provide me with feedback.  If you did not try it, Why not?  If you did, what happened?  This is written for people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.  The Lesson is the same but under much different circumstances.  It is written for those who care for people with diabetes.  Whether you be Moms, Dads, brothers, sisters, doctors, nurses, CDE’s, friends.   Blood sugar is almost always moving; fluctuating.  Fluctuating blood sugar, outside, of the normal range, is uncomfortable and alters perception.   Managing diabetes (and I mean managing it not just living with it) demands intense, and often times,  persistent attention and intention.  It’s not a condition where you can take your medicine and forget about it.  Healing diabetes requires even more intensity.  Those of us dealing with diabetes on a physical level appreciate your assistance and really value those of you who really get it, as much as you are able to.  It is not an easy thing for anyone to confront.

The Lesson of Diabetes is, in a word,  Balance.   Balance is also the means and the ends.  Balance is the Way.  The Way is Balance.  Here is the “twist.”  The Lesson must be made the priority.  In fact, we must surrender to the lesson in order to achieve balance.  OK.  Here is the hard truth right between the eyes.  If you have type 1 diabetes your physical system is really out of balance.  It is so out of balance that if you do not have injectable insulin your physical body would waste away in a matter of days or weeks depending how on how little you ate.  The less you eat the slower you will go.

How do you surrender to The Lesson of Balance?  It may sound familiar to some of you but the first step is to admit we are out of balance?  Admit is a form of surrender.  It is certainly a rational starting point.  Now, don’t pass by this step too fast.  This is deep work and while it starts with, perhaps, an understanding of the condition and what needs to be done, it slowly transforms into a moment by moment meditation.  In my work, I guide those I work with on this process.

Once The Lesson has been established as the aspiration, the work can begin.  There is hope.  I know it!  Through my ten years of being on a healing path I have seen the truth to this disease.  I know we can slay it.  Let’s giddy up!

3 thoughts on “The Diabetes Lesson”

  1. Michael, great to read your thoughts. I, too, am a type 1 on a healing journey. I was diagnosed at age 16 and am now 57. I’ve been through many diets and regimens, I have been working on healing since around age 35 years. Like you I draw a distinction between healing and curing. I’ve come to see type 1 as an instrument for learning spiritual as well as daily life lessons. I look forward to corresponding with you along these lines. I’ll let my friend, who like us is a type 1 on a healing journey, know about your blog. I will be in touch.
    Oh, and I’m curious about your diet and regimen. After a number of diets, including 7 years raw vegan, I’ve been on the extremely low carb “paleo” diet for over 2 years. This seems to create the greatest balance, as you observed. I would love hear from you about this.
    Aimee

  2. Well written Michael. There are lessons of ‘balance’ that apply to all ! Thanks for sharing.

  3. Thank you for reading my writing Dennis. I have been following your blogs. Sometimes it is difficult for me to read because it so intense what you had to deal with. My condition is a grind. Yours was like running into a bus. I guess it is all relative. What do we do with our experience except share it?

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